Observations of a Two-Group Society

Main Menu           Previous Topic                                                           Next Topic


What Happens to a Minority in a Society?

We now consider a society that is composed of two groups, a minority and a majority. Both groups share some facts in common, but also have a monopoly on their own particular set of facts. In order to observe this situation, we observe two variables:

The first is the average probability that a member of the minority interacts with someone else in the minority. We call this the intragroup interaction probability.

The second is the average probability that a member of the minority interacts with a member of the majority. We call this the intergroup interaction probability.

We expect that initially, since minority members share a lot of facts with other minority members, the intragroup interaction probability will be higher than the intergroup interaction probability. On the next slide, we will construct such a society and observe what happens to these two variables.

                   Previous Slide                                                           Next Slide